Emergency Management Agency

TBA
Stacks Image 1111
2301 E. Columbus Dr.
Suite - A213
East Chicago, IN 46312
Phone: 219-391-8310

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EMA Functions


DEMC is responsible for coordinating the city of East Chicago’s preparedness for and response to emergency situations, seeking homeland security grants and coordinating educational programs. DEMC develops policies and procedures governing emergency responders’ actions during incidents involving man made weapons of mass destruction or natural incidents, so that they can interact with other partners to effectively and efficiently respond to emergencies.
DEMC is also East Chicago’s liaison with the United States Department of Homeland Security, the Indiana Office of Homeland Security, as well as county, state, and federal emergency management agencies.

Responsibilities of the Director of EMA


Activate and command the EOC during major incidents

Coordinate educational training programs for first responders

Attend local emergency planning council meetings

Seek Homeland Security as well as other equipment and educational grants

Conduct vulnerabilities and threat assessment of the city’s public assets

Continuously research and work with other local government and emergency management agencies, regarding emergency preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery practices

Seek out local, state and federal funding opportunities for the city’s preparedness and response measures

Maintain Emergency Response plans for East Chicago’s hospital, commercial and/or industrial businesses

Help to develop and maintain mutual aid agreements and/or memorandums of understanding between East Chicago and other surrounding communities within and outside of Lake County

Effectively manage and share information which enhances incident management and response with local jurisdiction first responders (i.e. fire, police, EMS, and public health)

Effectively coordinate training of all local jurisdiction first responders in using processes and systems described in the NIMS (National Incident Management System)

Make a plan


  • East Chicago Department of Emergency Management and Communications
  • The East Chicago Department of Emergency Management would like to encourage all residents to prepare a basic emergency rescue plan. An emergency or disaster can happen at any time and being prepared significantly increases your chances of survival. For more information on disaster preparedness visit Ready.Gov
  • Respectfully,
  • Herbert R. Cruz
  • Make A Plan
  • Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to plan in advance: how you will contact one another; how you will get back together; and what you will do in different situations.
  • Family Emergency Plan
  • It may be easier to make a long-distance phone call than to call across town, so an out-of-town contact may be in a better position to communicate among separated family members.
  • Be sure every member of your family knows the phone number and has coins or a prepaid phone card to call the emergency contact.
  • You may have trouble getting through, or the telephone system may be down altogether, but be patient.
  • Emergency Information
  • Find out what kinds of disasters, both natural and man-made, are most likely to occur in your area and how you will be notified. Methods of getting your attention vary from community to community. One common method is to broadcast via emergency radio and TV broadcasts. You might hear a special siren, or get a telephone call, or emergency workers may go door-to-door.
  • Emergency Plans
  • You may also want to inquire about emergency plans at places where your family spends time: work, daycare and school. If no plans exist, consider volunteering to help create one. Talk to your neighbors about how you can work together in the event of an emergency. You will be better prepared to safely reunite your family and loved ones during an emergency if you think ahead and communicate with others in advance. Read more: School and Workplace.
  • Be Informed
  • Some of the things you can do to prepare for the unexpected, such as making an emergency supply kit and developing a family communications plan, are the same for both a natural or man-made emergency.
  • However, there are important differences among potential emergencies that will impact the decisions you make and the actions you take. Learn more about the potential emergencies that could happen where you live and the appropriate way to respond to them.
  • In addition, learn about the emergency plans that have been established in your area by your state and local government.
  • Emergency preparedness is no longer the sole concern of earthquake prone Californians and those who live in the part of the country known as "Tornado Alley." For Americans, preparedness must now account for man-made disasters as well as natural ones. Knowing what to do during an emergency is an important part of being prepared and may make all the difference when seconds count

Emergency Operations Center (EOC)


During a major incident, whether man-made (WMD) or natural, the Department of Emergency Management will activate the EOC (Emergency Operations Center), to coordinate support functions and provide resource support. The Director will assemble the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) Coordination Group in the EOC, which includes the Mayor and Directors of all public safety agencies

As the incident develops and assistance beyond the local level is required, the EMA and/or EOC will coordinate requests outside the local jurisdiction for regional, state, and/or federal assets.

The EOC:


Provides a path to elected officials and may be activated to receive and coordinate regional, state and federal aid
Coordinates public information from the IC/UC and EOC
Activates emergency operations plans
Provides for prompt notification of local and state agencies
Allows use of emergency powers, such as curfews and evacuations
Allows smooth mobilization and deployment of resources and support staff


The DEMC works with local jurisdiction first responders (fire, EMS, police, health, etc.) as well as county, state, and federal agencies to provide resources and expertise in four major areas:

Mitigation
Preparedness
Response
Recovery


Mitigation involves preventative measures that will decrease or eliminate the potential of a specific city asset becoming a target, as well as decrease or eliminate the effects of an attack or disaster, should one occur.

Preparedness includes training and exercises, creating disaster supply kits, procuring adequate emergency equipment, and employing weather forecasting and early warning systems. The DEMC maintains an asset inventory and emergency operations plan for the City of East Chicago. All city departments must maintain a copy of the Emergency Operations Plan and notification protocols. The DEMC plans and holds training exercises with city departments and outside agencies and in addition is available to make presentations to civic and business groups on emergency preparedness.

Response is the first phase of emergency management that occurs after the onset of a disaster. When our local first responders (fire, police, EMS, etc.) require assistance in responding to a major crisis, they call the DEMC and request that the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) be activated. The EOC is activated to coordinate the response efforts of all local and outside agencies as effectively and quickly as possible to provide for the continuity of services to the public and to provide status reports to the Mayor on existing conditions.

Recovery involves measures that are taken to return to a normal or safer situation following an emergency or disaster.

911 Communications Center

The 911 Communications Center is manned by sixteen (16) communication dispatchers including four (4) crew leaders. There are four (4) crew shifts consisting of four (4) dispatchers in each shift. Dispatchers handle all police, fire, and emergency medical services (EMS) call taking and dispatch operations. The 911 Communications Center is under the supervision of police Sgt. Jorge Almedina.

Advisory


Be sure to have a picture of you and your pet together. It will help you document ownership and identify your pet if separated during an emergency.
Extreme Heat
A heat wave is an extended period of extreme heat, and is often accompanied by high humidity. These conditions can be dangerous and even life-threatening for humans who don't take the proper precautions.
Step 1: Get a Kit
  • Get an Emergency Supply Kit which includes items like non-perishable food, water, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio, extra flashlights and batteries.
Step 2: Make a Plan
Prepare Your Family
  • Make a Family Emergency Plan. Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to know how you will contact one another, how you will get back together and what you will do in case of an emergency.
  • Plan places where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood.
  • It may be easier to make a long-distance phone call than to call across town, so an out-of-town contact may be in a better position to communicate among separated family members.
  • You may also want to inquire about emergency plans at places where your family spends time: work, daycare and school. If no plans exist, consider volunteering to help create one.
  • Be sure to consider the specific needs of your family members
  • Notify caregivers and babysitters about your plan.
  • Make plans for your pets
Take a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) class from your local Citizen Corps chapter. Keep your training current.
Step 3: Be Informed
Prepare Your Home
  • Install window air conditioners snugly; insulate if necessary.
  • Check air-conditioning ducts for proper insulation.
  • Install temporary window reflectors (for use between windows and drapes), such as aluminum foil-covered cardboard, to reflect heat back outside.
  • Weather-strip doors and sills to keep cool air in.
  • Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun with drapes, shades, awnings or louvers. (Outdoor awnings or louvers can reduce the heat that enters a home by up to 80 percent.)
  • Keep storm windows up all year.
Listen to Local Officials Learn about the emergency plans that have been established in your area by your state and local government. In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials. For further information on how to plan and prepare for extreme heat, visit: Federal Emergency Management Agency, American Red Cross or NOAA Watch